Forbidden Corner: Something different in the Yorkshire Dales

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Looking for something different on your next trip to the Yorkshire Dales? The Forbidden Corner is quirky, fun, and definitely something different.  

Ever walked through the mouth of a burping castle wall? Been squirted by a griffin? Or peeped in on a class of mice?  

This may sound like it’s only for children, but we assure you, it indulges an adult’s inner child. Showing our age here, but if you ever dreamed of being in David Bowie’s movie Labyrinth, then you are going to LOVE THIS PLACE!

What is The Forbidden Corner?

Forbidden Corner is a 4-acre labyrinth. Nothing like your run-of-the-mill hedge maze. Elaborate corridors wind into underground tunnels and castle walls. Decisions and surprises await you at every corner. 

Grab a check off sheet and start your adventure in the mouth of the castle walls. From there, the path leads in multiple directions.     

Giant face resembling a monkey opens it's mouth for visitors to enter at Forbidden Corner

Statues squirt, horses talk, and mice sing. There’s the temple of the underworld, a giant tree lumberjack, and a pyramid made of glass. Castle walls and tower provide gorgeous views of the surrounding deer fields and Yorkshire Dales. 

The detail that has gone into this place is astounding.

Our favorite section sends you down an Alice-in-Wonderland type tunnel.  But, we don’t want to give too much away, as half the fun is not knowing what is around the corner.  

You’ll also be pleased to know, they add new attractions all the time. If you went when you were a kid, you’d be surprised just how much it changed. 

Elaborate metal knight gate at Forbidden Corner
Castle wall at Forbidden Corner in the

Story of The Forbidden Corner

Built by Colin Armstrong CMG O.B.E., an eccentric, and obviously wealthy, British Consul.  In 1989, Colin enlisted his good friend and architect, Malcolm Tempest, to help design a private grotto for his future grandchildren.

The two clearly went overboard. The vision of their “little grotto” expanded immensely over the years.

Visitors wonder through the garden at Forbidden Corner in the Yorkshire Dales

It wasn’t until 1993, when a group of Hull University students arranged to tour the unfinished gardens that the idea to open to the public was born. In 1994, The Forbidden Corner opened to the public.

In 2000, the unique attraction almost closed as the Yorkshire Dale National Park realized the attraction did not have planning permission. Concerned with the traffic and pollution the attraction brought to the area, the park denied their retrospective permit.

Loyal visitors started a petition, and sent letters, which influenced officials to keep the park open. However, with the condition that visitation must be limited. This is why it is very important to book ahead of time online.

Knight statue holding his leg over his shoulder at Forbidden Corner
Fountain with frogs and clock in the Herb Garden at Forbidden Corner

How much is Forbidden Corner?

Tickets are sold on a first come, first serve basis. Purchase tickets ahead of time through Forbidden Corner’s website, they often sell out days in advance.  

2020 Pricing

Adults: £13.00
Senior Citizens: £12.00
Children age 4 to 15: £11.00

Children under 4: Free.
Family Ticket (2 adults + 2 children): £46.00

Parking is free.

Giant Tree Lumberjack at Forbidden Corner Yorkshire
Wood Bear statue at Forbidden Corner in the Yorkshire Dales

When is Forbidden Corner open?

Forbidden Corner is open from April 1 to early November.

After that, the attraction only opens on Sundays until Christmas.

Monday – Saturday 12 noon – 6 pm (until dusk if earlier).
Sundays and Bank Holidays 10 am – 6 pm (until dusk if earlier).

Forbidden Corner Castle Walkway
Castle Tower at Forbidden Corner in the Yorkshire Dales

Where is Forbidden Corner?

Located on the far east side of the Yorkshire Dales National Park, Forbidden Corner is a ways away from anywhere in particular. Middleham is the largest nearby village, 3 miles away.

Use postcode DL8 4TQ for GPS.

View of the Yorkshire Dales deer field from Forbidden Corner

How long does Forbidden Corner take?

Allow 2 – 3 hours to make your way through the labyrinth. We took a little bit longer to try every pathway and we went through the Herb Garden.

What age is Forbidden Corner suitable for?

Technically, the attraction is for all ages. We saw a 3-year-old laughing and an 5-year-old crying, so it really depends on your kid’s tolerance. 

Most kids seemed to enjoy it, but the underground tunnels and pathways can be very scary, especially for younger ones. You can skip these areas, but we feel this would miss out on a lot of the attraction.

Plus, the narrow pathways and stairs make most of the attraction impossible for pushchairs.

If you are with a child that needs a pushchair, scares easily, doesn’t like the dark, or loud noises, you may want to wait until they are a little older.

Devil welcomes visitors to the underworld at Forbidden Corner
Caliban Monster hiding at Forbidden Corner

Where to eat for Forbidden Corner?

On the grounds is the lovely Corner Café, which serves sandwiches, jacket potatoes, burgers and Yorkshire pies (of course). We found their prices reasonable and the food pretty good.

They also recently opened The Saddle Room Restaurant. We didn’t get a chance to try this, but the reviews are pretty good. They have typical pub food, but also higher end meals.  

Where to stay near Forbidden Corner?

Along with The Saddle Room Restaurant, The Forbidden Corner recently added a bed and breakfast and cottages to the property.

The ideal location makes The Saddle Room at Tupgill Park the perfect place to stay.

Booking.com

We hope you love the Forbidden Corner as much as we do. If you have been, leave us a comment on what you loved the most. 

Help Needed: We are on the lookout for similar attractions to the Forbidden Corner, places with labyrinths, quirky statues, squirting fountains. Do you know of any interesting places we should put on our list? Please send them to us or leave them in the comments, Thanks!

If you found this post useful, share it. 

Thanks so much!

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